5 Best Spotify Alternatives for Music Streaming

Spotify remains a top-tier music streaming service as more people switch from physical formats and music downloads to digital listening.  

The service is renowned for its deep library of more than 40 million songs. You can find tons of old favorites or discover new artists and bands. Not only that, but it also offers collaborative playlists, podcasts, early album access, and its new music discovery algorithm delivers excellent playlists each week tailored to your tastes.

However, Spotify may not be available for everyone, and though its free version allows you to stream playlists and stations, it comes with ads. Plus, its on-demand song selection restricts you to pick songs from a limited number of set playlists.

Best Alternative to Spotify for Music Streaming

If you’re looking for the best Spotify alternatives, our list of free and paid music streaming service favorites will help you pick the right one for you.

1. Apple Music

Apple Music boasts a content mix of 60 million songs ad-free, and audio or video playlists curated to suit your music tastes. The music quality is clean, snappy, and entertaining compared to what you get on Spotify.

While the service was designed for Apple devices, you can still access it on a range of platforms including Android devices, Windows PC or your favorite internet browser.

The smart interface is simply laid out and effective so you can navigate easily. You can also download your favorite tracks to play them offline, view song lyrics, and access some exclusive music including the Beats 1 radio station.

Plus, Apple Music integrates with Apple Watch and Siri perfectly, and you stream directly from a HomePod without any issues. However, you can set up the service on your computer or smartphone and stream music via your Bluetooth speaker.

Compared to Spotify, which offers a free version with ads, Apple Music offers a 3-months free trial for new customers. This is a month longer than Spotify’s trial period for its comparable plans, making it a great Spotify alternative. 

Once your Apple Music trial period is over, you can choose from the Individual plan $9.99 per month for one account, Student plan is also available for $4.99 per month or $14.99 for a Family plan.

Note: If you want to switch from Spotify to Apple Music, check out our guide on how to convert a Spotify playlist to an Apple Music playlist.

2. Amazon Music Unlimited

Amazon Music Unlimited is one of the best Spotify alternatives for Amazon Prime subscribers because it saves you a few bucks, has a huge music library, and you can stream music from an Echo or other Alexa product.

The service may not beat Spotify in terms of personalization and sharing features, but it’s still a reliable option and it works on a range of platforms. 

Some of these platforms include Android, iOS, Windows and Mac via its desktop app or web player. Some in-car music systems, TVs, Fire tablets and audio products also support Amazon Music Unlimited, but you can’t use it on multiple devices at a go.

The interface is slick and user-friendly so you can browse through the music catalogue without fuss, and discover new music easily. Thanks to its tight integration with Amazon’s Alexa, you can access free, ad-supported stations and playlists via Alexa voice assistant by asking Alexa to play music. 

The service costs $9.99 per month, but if you’re an Amazon Prime subscriber, you’ll pay $7.99 per month or $79 annually. You can also select a Family plan for $14.99 with support for six people, or go for the cheaper plan at $3.99 per month if you just want to stream music on an Amazon Echo or Echo Dot.

For new members, a free 30-day trial is available, after which the subscription will continue automatically for the regular monthly price unless you cancel.

3. Deezer

French company Deezer is a one-stop-shop for all your music needs with 56 million tracks to discover and listen to, podcasts and live radio.

Some of the best-in-class features you can get in Deezer include Shuffle Mode, which allows you to discover new tracks, and the SongCatcher, which identifies songs playing in your surroundings.

If you want personalized recommendations, you can tell Deezer Flow what you like and it’ll create the perfect mix based on your tastes, and help you find new artists and tracks. You can also discover podcasts, though the library is a far cry compared to the 1.9 million podcasts in Spotify’s library.

Deezer also lets you organize your music by genre or artist, listen to any playlist you want or create your own, and use the Favorites feature to add the tracks you love to your collection. Plus, you can play Deezer from a range of platforms including Windows, Mac, Chromebooks, Android and iOS devices, Apple Watch, Garmin, Fitbit, smart TVs, and Xbox One game consoles.

The free version comes with ads, but you can go limitless with Deezer Premium for $4.99 with no ads, 30-days free, Offline Mode, unlimited skips, and Amazon Alexa compatibility. A Family plan is also available for $7.49, with no ads or shuffling, one free month and supports six profiles.

4. YouTube Music

If you’re plugged into Google’s ecosystem of products or want to listen to songs on demand, YouTube Music is a convenient Spotify alternative.

YouTube Music is smart, serving you interesting playlists based on your location, and you can search for a song based on its lyrics. The platform offers a decent music library and integrates well with Google’s other apps including Google Assistant.

If you have an iOS device, you can access YouTube Music wherever you are, or stream music on the web. However, the app doesn’t integrate with Alexa, so you’ll be stuck if you try to play music through an Echo.

YouTube Music also offers a free ad-supported version like Spotify, so you can try it out before committing to a monthly plan. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe to the discounted Student plan for $4.99 per month or Family plan for $14.99 with support for six people.

A one-month free trial is included with each premium plan, but if you have a YouTube Premium subscription, you can enjoy YouTube Music for free besides ad-free video playback and exclusive video content.

5. Tidal

Tidal is slightly different from Spotify and other music streaming services owing to its high resolution audio quality, and a HiFi plan with 1,411Kbps in FLAC format. This means that you get to listen to music in full CD quality, though your audio gear also needs to be of higher quality to enjoy the benefits of lossless audio.

The service offers excellent sound performance, offline listening, and access to 3D audio tracks. You can use Tidal on a range of platforms including Android, iOS and desktop, all of which offer high-res streams.

If you like hip-hop and R&B, Tidal offers some notable exclusive content and launches, music videos, access to select sports or concert tickets, and behind-the-scenes content.

Although Tidal’s music quality beats Spotify’s 320Kbps bitrate, the service lacks some features like lyrics and you can’t upload your own songs. If you want the best high quality music streaming experience, Tidal is unquestionably it.

Tidal doesn’t have a free version but a 30-day trial is available for new members who sign up for a regularly priced plan. Tidal Premium plans start at $9.99 for an individual account and $14.99 for a Family plan that supports six people. The HiFi plan starts at $19.99 for a single account and $29.99 for a Family account for six people.

For students, there’s a Premium plan for $4.99 a month or $9.99 a month for the HiFi option.

Get Your Music Fix

Whether you’re at home or on the go, a good music streaming service is key to keep up on all the latest songs. Whichever service you choose, you’ll have a better time with your music if you play it on good headphones, speakers, and other audio equipment that sounds great.

If you’re looking for audio gear, be sure to check out our roundups of the best Bluetooth speakers and best Bluetooth earbuds on a budget. For kids, check out our Spotify for Kids review or turn to our guide on the best music apps for kids.

What’s your favorite Spotify alternative? Tell us about it in the comments.

source https://www.online-tech-tips.com/software-reviews/5-best-spotify-alternatives-for-music-streaming/

Google My Activity: Why You Should Care

When you search on Google, watch YouTube videos, or use Maps to get directions, you leave footprints for Google to collect. Data is one of Google’s most prized assets, so it harvests as much information it can when you use its products and services.

In view of this, have you ever stopped to wonder what Google does with the data it collects from you? Or if there’s a way to access this information? Should you even care?

Google records almost everything you do with apps, websites, and other services connected to your Google account. This information is compiled and saved in an online profile called “My Activity.”

In the next sections, we’ll explain what “Google My Activity” is and how you can use the tool to control Google’s data collection activity.

What Is Google My Activity?

Think of your hospital medical records for a second. It usually contains information about your hospital visits and admission; habits and allergies; medication history; test results; past and present diagnosis; etc. The more information a hospital has about your medical history and habits, the better and faster the doctor is able to diagnose and treat you.

This is akin to the purpose of Google My Activity. It’s a record of your online activities on Google and interactions with its services.

Google My Activity (or My Activity, for short) is the archive of your Google data. It’s also a tool that lets you view and manage data that Google collects when you use its products and services. As Google puts it, My Activity is designed to “put you in control of your data.”

With My Activity, you can scrutinize how much (or little?) of your information and online activities Google may access.

Before we show you how to access the My Activity utility, and how to use it to manage your data, let’s have a look at some of the information Google collects each time you use any of its products and services.

What Data Does Google Collect?

Google collects data for several reasons. However, the major purpose of data collection is to improve its services and provide a personalized experience (customized ads and search results, for example). You can learn more about why Google collects data on its Privacy Policy page

The information Google collects when you use its services include, but not limited to, the following:

  • Things you search for (on Google and YouTube).
  • Videos you watch.
  • Ads that you view or click.
  • Location information and history (places you visit and places you’ve been).
  • Tools that you use to access Google’s services (browser information, apps, devices, etc.)
  • Websites you visit.

These information are usually grouped into three categories. Understanding this data segmentation will help you understand how to navigate the Google My Activity page and manage your data.

1. Web and App Activity: Here, you’ll find your Google Search history, browsing history on Google Chrome, and websites you visit on other applications connected to your Google account. There’s more: audio recordings of your voice searches (on Google Maps and Google Search), map navigations, as well as your interactions with Google Assistant are also saved in this category.

Other information saved on this page include your IP address, ads you click, and things you purchase on an advertiser’s website. If you use an Android device, Google will save information about your phone (battery level, installed applications, system errors, etc.) in this section of the My Activity page.

2. YouTube History: This section houses your YouTube activities including the videos you search for on YouTube, videos that you watch, the date and time you watched these videos, as well as the devices used to watch them.

3. Location History: If you use an Android device with location services enabled, Google will save the places you visit, even when you aren’t using a Google service. For iOS devices, Google collects your location (in real-time) via the dedicated Google app.

What Happens When You Delete or Disable Data Collection?

For every Google account, Google automatically collects these information (and more) by default. However, you have the liberty to limit data collection or stop it entirely. So if you’d rather not have Google save your information in its database, you can delete your online activity history from the My Activity page. But what happens when you do so?

Well, there’s really no severe consequence attached to denying Google access to your data. You’ll enjoy the basic features of Google’s services just like every other user. However, you’ll lose access to personalized features, ads, and recommendations.

For example, disabling YouTube History means you’ll no longer get suggestions when you search for videos. Likewise, YouTube will stop recommending videos it thinks you might like.

When you turn off Location History, Google will stop sending you tips about your commute (in Maps), neither will you receive recommendations and ads about places you’ve been/visited.

Discover and Control Your Data

You can access the Google My Activity utility on your mobile devices and computer. Follow the steps listed below to learn how to view and manage your data via Google My Activity on Android, iOS, and PC.

Use Google My Activity on PC

1. Launch your preferred web browser and visit the Google My Activity page (or type myactivity.google.com into your browser’s URL).

You may be required to sign into your Google account if you haven’t done so already.

2. You’ll find the aforementioned categories (Web & App Activity, Location History, and YouTube History) at the top of the My Activity dashboard.

Scroll to the bottom of the dashboard and you’ll find an overview of all recently-used Google apps and services—Maps, Google search history, and websites you visit.

Click the three-dot menu icon and select Details to learn more about the activity/item.

Otherwise, click Delete to remove it (permanently) from Google’s database.

On the Item details page, you’ll find precise information about the activity.

Say you searched for “Best Pet Stores in New York” on Google, the Item details page will reveal the exact date and time you performed the search, the device you used, and more.

Want to Stop Google from Collecting Your Data? Here’s What To Do

As mentioned earlier, you can also use the My Activity tool to limit Google’s data collection or put an end to it entirely. All you have to do is disable data collection for all three categories—Web & App Activity, Location History, and YouTube History.

Click the hamburger menu icon at the top-left corner and select Activity controls.

Go through the data options on the page and toggle each of them off.

To delete all previously-saved web activities, return to the My Activity homepage and tap the Delete drop-down button.

[10-delete-google-activity.png]

Select the All time option in the Delete Activity window.

Make sure you check the Select All box and click Next to proceed.

Set An Automatic Data Deletion Schedule

Google provides an auto-delete option to erase your account data. Scroll to the data group and select Auto-delete.

Choose from the Auto-delete options and click Next to proceed. Google only allows users to auto-delete data older than 3, 18, or 36 months.

Use Google My Activity on Android

If you use an Android-powered smartphone or table, here’s what you need to do.

1. Go to Settings and select Google.

2. Tap the Manage your Google Account button.

3. Go to the Data & personalization tab and select Manage your activity controls.

That will launch the Activity control page where you can access the data saved by Google across all services you’ve used

Use Google My Activity on iOS

You can also access the My Activity utility on your iPhone and iPad using the Google app.

1. Launch the Google app and tap the profile icon at the top-right corner.

2. Tap the Manage your Google Account button.

3. Select Personal info & privacy.

4. Scroll to the Manage your Google activity section and select Activity controls.

You’ll be able to manage data saved in your Google account on the resulting page.

Why Should You Care

You’ve probably had your Google account(s) for years. It only makes sense to know how much data you’re providing Google, what it knows about you, and how it’s handling your information. Right?

Interestingly, Google is transparent about its data collection process and practices. Even better, Google hands you (and a billion of other users) the meaningful choice around your data. You can opt in and out of all varieties of data collection at any time; you’re in the driver’s seat of your data.

Although saving your account’s activity will help Google improve and personalize your experience, it can get a bit creepy annoying sometimes. Say you made a search on “how to diaper a baby” on Google or YouTube, you’re bound to start seeing unending ads from different diaper brands on every app or website you visit.

If you aren’t happy with the amount of personal information that Google collects, or how your data is being used to deliver targeted ads to you, the My Activity tool is at your disposal. Use it to secure your data and protect your online privacy.

source https://www.online-tech-tips.com/google-softwaretips/google-my-activity-why-you-should-care/

Who Owns the Internet? Web Architecture Explained

Most people think of the Internet and the Web as a sort of formless thing “out there”, but the internet is very much a physical system. It’s the largest and most complex machine humanity has ever built and once you understand its size and complexity it seems like a miracle it works at all. 

No single entity “owns” the internet, but every single part of the internet belongs to someone! Confused? By the end of this article you won’t be!

The Difference Between the Internet and the Web

First, we need to clarify that the internet and the Web are two different things. The internet is the actual hardware and software that makes the global network, well, work. 

The Web, on the other hand, is a service that runs over the internet. Most of the internet isn’t the web. The Web and the websites that form it are just the most familiar public face of internet technology, but other services like FTP, email, video streaming and many more also flow through the same system.

In this article we’re using internet and web architecture a little loosely to make the explanation simpler, so don’t forget about the bigger picture.

A (Very) Short History of the Internet

There are plenty of great articles dedicated to the history of the internet, we’d recommend reading the one by the Internet Society for a perfect blend of detail and length. 

For our purposes here, what you need to know is that the internet began as a government project between the US military and public universities. They developed the first technologies that allowed computers to be networked together over long distances. 

Most importantly, this “internetwork” would be decentralized. So if large parts of it were knocked out, data could still find a way to get to the right destination. It’s called an internetwork, because it’s a network made up of other networks. One of these networks is actually entirely owned and operated by you!

The Internet Starts at Home

That’s right, the first network you encounter that makes up part of the internet is your own local home network. Your router networks all of the devices connected to it via Ethernet or WiFi together. 

Even if your connection to the internet goes down, your local network will still work. It’s like your own personal in-home internet and you can actually set up your own streaming servers, websites and cloud storage without any outside networking required. So, this is the part of the internet that you own. Congratulations!

Covering the Last Mile

Your local network’s connection to the internet at large happens through what’s sometimes known as the “last mile” connection. There are a variety of different last mile technologies. These can be wired or wireless. Common wired examples are optical fiber or copper-based DSL (digital subscriber line) connections.

Wireless internet connections are mostly through the cellular network, using 5G, LTE and other cellular data transmission standards. Rarely, sites might be connected by special long-range WiFi connections.

That last mile connection doesn’t plug you directly into the entire internet though, which doesn’t even make sense as a concept. What you’re actually connecting to is your internet service provider. Well, actually you’re usually connecting to several different internet service providers, although you’re not doing business directly with all of them. Don’t worry, it’ll soon be clear.

Three Tiers of Service Provider

Let’s say you have fiber internet, you may pay one company for the physical fiber internet connection and then pay another company for the actual internet access. The companies you do direct business with can be “Tier 3” internet service providers. They operate and service the last mile connection into your home and use the money their clients pay them to pay ISPs who actually own larger network infrastructure to carry their data.

These are known as “Tier 2” service providers. These providers also do business directly with customers, so your ISP may actually be a Tier 2 company. Their networks are large enough that they can negotiate “peering” agreements with other Tier 2 service providers. 

With such agreements these networks let internet data flow freely across the system. Since all the Tier 2 networks involved benefit from these peering arrangements, they’re usually made with little fuss. Still, no single Tier 2 network can reach the entire internet on its own, which is why they need to buy internet access on an even larger type of service provider network.

“Tier 1” service providers are at the top of the food chain. These companies own massive networks that are large enough to reach nearly every corner of the internet and where they can’t, they have peering arrangements with other Tier 1 networks to fill in the gaps.

As you can see, the internet consists of this hierarchy of networks. It’s a bit like a massive tree or arterial system. Last mile connections feed into local exchanges, which feed into high speed internet backbone networks, which then connect to massive international trunks. Your internet packets have to navigate that insanely complicated labyrinth just so you can chuckle at a funny cat on the internet. Think about that for a second.

Data Centers for Everyone

So this massive network of networks we call the internet makes sure we’re all connected, but it doesn’t actually have any of the content that we want the internet or the web for in the first place. The content of the internet (such as websites, cloud storage, etc.) exist at network nodes. The computer from which you upload pictures to Instagram is such a node and so are the servers that host the websites you like to visit. 

While you can easily run your own web server from home, these days the vast majority of servers (computers that host content and services) are inside massive data centers. These buildings hold thousands and thousands of special computers that power the internet and all of the services that run on them. They are often connected directly to nexus points in Tier 2 or Tier 1 networks, ensuring they can handle the massive amounts of data that have to flow in and out of them every day.

Undersea Cables, Satellites and Other Big Internet Tubes

While we’ve covered the broad strokes, there are some finer details about internet infrastructure worth mentioning. While network connections over continuous land aren’t that interesting, the internet covers the world. Where land masses are separated by massive bodies of water!

Ultra high-bandwidth undersea cables are the main data trunks that cover these gaps, but we’re also starting to see a new generation of satellite systems, such as StarLink, that can form a wireless internet web in the sky. There’s even ongoing research on new ways of transmitting data across vast distances using quantum physics. 

The internet is one of the few things that almost all nations cooperate on, because it’s beneficial to all of us. So while it’s true that no one person or entity owns the internet, it’s not wrong to say that together we own it as a collective and, while just over half of humans have access to it today, in the near future it really will connect every last one of us.

source https://www.online-tech-tips.com/computer-tips/who-owns-the-internet-web-architecture-explained/

Steam Not Opening? 7 Ways to Fix

Steam is the most popular gaming and community platform on the web. It has built a reputation over the years for its incredible sales, massive number of achievements for almost every game, and easy-to-use friend system. 

It’s the command center for most PC gamers. When it goes down or refuses to open, it impacts your entire gaming experience. If Steam is not opening, here are several ways you can fix it ordered from the easiest method to the most drastic.

Check if Steam Is Down

The first thing you should try before attempting any other fix is to find out if Steam is down. If the service is down, nothing else will work. You can check the website Is Steam Down? to verify, and the website also suggests other potential outlets for entertainment if Steam isn’t working.

You can also try Down Detector, which will not only show whether their service can access Steam but also if other users are experiencing similar problems.

Run Steam as Administrator

When you run a program as the administrator, you are telling the system that it’s safe and should be started regardless of security violations. If there are any background programs or firewalls blocking a program from starting, running them as the administrator should allow a program to open anyway.

Choose the Steam icon in your Start menu and right-click it, then select Run as administrator. This will circumvent any programs trying to stop Steam from booting. It’s a simple method that might not always work, but is one of the first things you should try. 

Update Windows

Steam performs a variety of security checks to ensure there’s no malware running within the program. The desktop client also uses a built-in version of the Chromium browser, which can sometimes throw an error if it isn’t running on the latest version of Windows.

Make sure your operating system is completely up to date. If there are updates available, go ahead and install them. Again, this is not a guaranteed fix, but will eliminate one potential source of problems.

End Steam Through the Task Manager

Programs and services will often encounter an error where they’re marked as operational by your computer, but will not actually boot. In situations like this, ensure there are no identical tasks running in the Task Manager and shut down any that are. For Steam, there are two processes to look for.

The first is Steam Client Boostrapper, which is the actual process of Steam itself. Ending this application will shut down Steam. The other is the Steam Client Webhelper, a background process that has sometimes caused problems when users tried to boot Steam. 

Shut down both of these and any related programs (anything process that is related to Steam in the background) before attempting to open Steam again.

Clear the Steam App Cache

Your computer stores apps you frequently use in a cache that allows those programs to boot more quickly and easily the next time you use them. Most of the time, this works without a hitch–but there are times when the cache stores the wrong data and results in errors. If your Steam cache contains an error, Steam might not open.

Open File Explorer and navigate to Local Disk (C:) > Program Files (x86) > Steam > appcache. Copy the entire appcache folder and paste it somewhere else in case you need it as a backup. 

After you have done this, delete the appcache folder and try to launch Steam. A new folder will be created when you do, hopefully free of any errors that prevented Steam from opening the first time around. 

Uninstall and Reinstall Steam

When all else fails, turn it off and turn it back on–from the ground up. Fully uninstall Steam from your computer. Go to Settings > Apps > Apps and features and then scroll down until you find Steam. Click the icon and then click the Uninstall button to remove Steam from your PC.

Once this has finished, go to the main Steam website. At the top of the screen, click the Install Steam icon. Alternatively, just follow this link. Download the latest version of Steam, reinstall it, and try to boot it again. Doing this clears the majority of the stored data from your computer and eliminates the majority of installation problems.

Bear in mind that uninstalling Steam will also remove all of your games and any save data that isn’t backed up to the cloud.

Perform a System Restore

If all else fails and Steam is still not opening, you can try a System Restore to a previous point when you know Steam worked. Various things can cause problems that nothing else seems to fix, especially Windows Updates. When this happens, you can perform a System Restore to revert back to a previous version of your system.

Windows 10 makes it a bit more difficult than necessary to find the System Restore function. There are two main ways to access it. First, open Control Panel > System and Security. You’ll see two drop-down menus: Security and Maintenance. Beneath these two is an option called Recovery.

Select Recovery and then select Open System Restore. Doing this will open the System Restore Wizard. Follow the on-screen instructions to proceed. Once you select Next, you can choose from a series of “restore points,” created before system updates and other events. You can also manually create restore points. 

Steam has been around for a long time, and during its existence there have been various bugs that crop up that can lead to Steam not opening. While most get resolved quickly, there are a few that linger–but the good news is these steps will help you resolve nearly any issue you encounter with Steam. 

Fix the problem, open your library, and get back to gaming. 

source https://www.online-tech-tips.com/computer-tips/steam-not-opening-7-ways-to-fix/

How Wired Security Camera Systems Work

A wired security camera system represents a significant investment of time, money and effort. However, if you have a large property to secure that needs many cameras for proper coverage, it’s the best long-term option. 

Getting started with a wired security camera system can seem daunting, but once you know how wired security camera systems work, it will all make perfect sense.

The Two Types of Wired Security Camera Systems

The first order of business is to cover the two main types of wires security camera systems. 

The traditional wired camera system uses analogue coaxial cables and offers a relatively lower quality image. More modern systems use cameras that transmit data digitally over Ethernet cabling.

Both types of camera receive power over their respective cable types, so you don’t need to worry about providing power at the point of installation.

Typical Components in a Wired Security Camera System

Whichever type of wired security camera system you choose, the basic components are the same:

  • The actual cameras and their mountings.
  • The cables that run from the individual cameras.
  • A hub device that connects all the cameras.
  • A recording system, often integrated into the hub device.
  • A hard drive to store recordings.
  • A monitor to view the live feed from the camera system.
  • Sometimes, a computer to manage and control the system is required.

While most wired camera security systems have these components, the individual capabilities of each component can vary significantly. For example, the hub device might have the ability to connect to the internet or it may just be a simple video switcher.

A Closer Look at Wired Cameras

The cameras themselves can vary. Most wired security camera starter kits will give you a few identical cameras, but it’s important to match the different types of camera to the environments they’ll be expected to operate in.

For example, if you’re going to use a camera outdoors, you should certainly look for a model that’s been designed to work in rain, sleet, snow and other environmental hazards.

The same goes for low light environments. In those cases you want cameras that can see well when there’s not much light. Some cameras are sold as having “night vision”, which usually means that they are sensitive to infrared light.

Cameras can have different fields of view and focal lengths. So you also need to keep that in mind when choosing which cameras to use for your various surveillance spots.

Wired Security Camera Installation Overview

So what does it take to install a wired security camera system? It can be pretty complicated, but the basic work involved includes:

  • Mounting the cameras in their correct locations. Usually by drilling holes and then screwing the mount into place.
  • Drilling holes through which to route cabling. This can be a challenge because you may have to drill through a wide variety of materials.
  • Pulling and routing cable between the cameras and hub device.
  • Attaching the connectors for each respective type of cable.
  • Connecting the cameras to the hub device.
  • Connecting the hub device to a monitor.
  • Installing a hard drive in the hub device or attaching the video output to a computer with a capture card.

While mounting the cameras and setting up the video receiver hub, video recorder, computer and monitor are all relatively easy, it’s the cabling that offers a real challenge.

Attaching the connectors at the ends of the routed cable can be particularly tricky. Coaxial cables aren’t that hard to connect, although you need to take care with insulation and waterproofing where appropriate. Ethernet cables require a special crimping tool and knowledge of what the correct wiring order is according to a wiring diagram. 

You can of course purchase lengths of cable with connectors already attached, but this can mean having excess cables or ones that are too short. If you pay to have cables made to length, make sure your measurements are accurate!

The Pros and Cons of Wired Cameras

The biggest con for a wired camera security system is undoubtedly how much of a pain it is to install it. Once you have it installed, you’ll find it’s the most reliable and foolproof solution. 

Since the cameras all draw power from the video receiver, it’s simple to keep the system running in the event of a power outage, especially a deliberate one. All you have to do is attach the main system to a suitable uninterruptible power supply.

One disadvantage of using a wired camera system is that a nefarious criminal might simply cut the wire from a particular camera. This means that you really need to do a good job when routing cables, so that they aren’t obvious. They need to be installed in such a way that they are detection and tamper resistant. Especially when it comes to exterior cameras. 

Wired camera systems can also be a nuisance when something goes wrong with the cabling. If a mischievous rat decides to nibble through one of your cables, it can be hard to find the break or to access it for a repair.

Finally, another large advantage of a wired system like this is that you can keep it completely off-grid if you like. Assuming that you don’t mind losing remote access to the feed. Which means you don’t have to worry about someone hacking into your cameras, which is a real concern with internet-connected camera devices.

The Pros and Cons of Wireless Cameras

The biggest advantage that wireless cameras have over wired systems is the ease of installation. As long as your camera is within WiFi range, all you have to do is make sure it has power.

Which brings us to the first downside of a wireless camera: power. Each camera needs to be plugged into an outlet. Which means you either have to limit your camera placement to where power is available or do additional wiring, which rather defeats the point. Battery-powered wireless cameras are also an option, but as you can imagine this brings a new set of issues to the table.

Another limitation of wireless cameras is that you can’t have too many of them running at the same time. Not only because of WiFi congestion, but because the apps that operate them generally only support around four cameras at the same time. That’s not a big deal for apartments or small homes, but anyone with bigger spaces to cover is out of luck.

These cameras can also suffer from the same sorts of interference as any other WiFi device. Unless you connect them to a router that has no internet connection, they always have the risk of being hacked.

Who are Wired Systems For?

Wired camera systems are best for people with larger budgets. Especially budgets that include professional installation. If you want a solid surveillance system with many cameras, robust recording and the option to go off-grid, wired is the way to go.

Wireless cameras are best for small dwellings where you want to spend as little as possible, have an easy installation process or perhaps in situations where you aren’t allowed to drill extensively. The choice is ultimately up to you!

source https://www.online-tech-tips.com/computer-tips/how-wired-security-camera-systems-work/

How Wired Security Camera Systems Work

A wired security camera system represents a significant investment of time, money and effort. However, if you have a large property to secure that needs many cameras for proper coverage, it’s the best long-term option. 

Getting started with a wired security camera system can seem daunting, but once you know how wired security camera systems work, it will all make perfect sense.

The Two Types of Wired Security Camera Systems

The first order of business is to cover the two main types of wires security camera systems. 

The traditional wired camera system uses analogue coaxial cables and offers a relatively lower quality image. More modern systems use cameras that transmit data digitally over Ethernet cabling.

Both types of camera receive power over their respective cable types, so you don’t need to worry about providing power at the point of installation.

Typical Components in a Wired Security Camera System

Whichever type of wired security camera system you choose, the basic components are the same:

  • The actual cameras and their mountings.
  • The cables that run from the individual cameras.
  • A hub device that connects all the cameras.
  • A recording system, often integrated into the hub device.
  • A hard drive to store recordings.
  • A monitor to view the live feed from the camera system.
  • Sometimes, a computer to manage and control the system is required.

While most wired camera security systems have these components, the individual capabilities of each component can vary significantly. For example, the hub device might have the ability to connect to the internet or it may just be a simple video switcher.

A Closer Look at Wired Cameras

The cameras themselves can vary. Most wired security camera starter kits will give you a few identical cameras, but it’s important to match the different types of camera to the environments they’ll be expected to operate in.

For example, if you’re going to use a camera outdoors, you should certainly look for a model that’s been designed to work in rain, sleet, snow and other environmental hazards.

The same goes for low light environments. In those cases you want cameras that can see well when there’s not much light. Some cameras are sold as having “night vision”, which usually means that they are sensitive to infrared light.

Cameras can have different fields of view and focal lengths. So you also need to keep that in mind when choosing which cameras to use for your various surveillance spots.

Wired Security Camera Installation Overview

So what does it take to install a wired security camera system? It can be pretty complicated, but the basic work involved includes:

  • Mounting the cameras in their correct locations. Usually by drilling holes and then screwing the mount into place.
  • Drilling holes through which to route cabling. This can be a challenge because you may have to drill through a wide variety of materials.
  • Pulling and routing cable between the cameras and hub device.
  • Attaching the connectors for each respective type of cable.
  • Connecting the cameras to the hub device.
  • Connecting the hub device to a monitor.
  • Installing a hard drive in the hub device or attaching the video output to a computer with a capture card.

While mounting the cameras and setting up the video receiver hub, video recorder, computer and monitor are all relatively easy, it’s the cabling that offers a real challenge.

Attaching the connectors at the ends of the routed cable can be particularly tricky. Coaxial cables aren’t that hard to connect, although you need to take care with insulation and waterproofing where appropriate. Ethernet cables require a special crimping tool and knowledge of what the correct wiring order is according to a wiring diagram. 

You can of course purchase lengths of cable with connectors already attached, but this can mean having excess cables or ones that are too short. If you pay to have cables made to length, make sure your measurements are accurate!

The Pros and Cons of Wired Cameras

The biggest con for a wired camera security system is undoubtedly how much of a pain it is to install it. Once you have it installed, you’ll find it’s the most reliable and foolproof solution. 

Since the cameras all draw power from the video receiver, it’s simple to keep the system running in the event of a power outage, especially a deliberate one. All you have to do is attach the main system to a suitable uninterruptible power supply.

One disadvantage of using a wired camera system is that a nefarious criminal might simply cut the wire from a particular camera. This means that you really need to do a good job when routing cables, so that they aren’t obvious. They need to be installed in such a way that they are detection and tamper resistant. Especially when it comes to exterior cameras. 

Wired camera systems can also be a nuisance when something goes wrong with the cabling. If a mischievous rat decides to nibble through one of your cables, it can be hard to find the break or to access it for a repair.

Finally, another large advantage of a wired system like this is that you can keep it completely off-grid if you like. Assuming that you don’t mind losing remote access to the feed. Which means you don’t have to worry about someone hacking into your cameras, which is a real concern with internet-connected camera devices.

The Pros and Cons of Wireless Cameras

The biggest advantage that wireless cameras have over wired systems is the ease of installation. As long as your camera is within WiFi range, all you have to do is make sure it has power.

Which brings us to the first downside of a wireless camera: power. Each camera needs to be plugged into an outlet. Which means you either have to limit your camera placement to where power is available or do additional wiring, which rather defeats the point. Battery-powered wireless cameras are also an option, but as you can imagine this brings a new set of issues to the table.

Another limitation of wireless cameras is that you can’t have too many of them running at the same time. Not only because of WiFi congestion, but because the apps that operate them generally only support around four cameras at the same time. That’s not a big deal for apartments or small homes, but anyone with bigger spaces to cover is out of luck.

These cameras can also suffer from the same sorts of interference as any other WiFi device. Unless you connect them to a router that has no internet connection, they always have the risk of being hacked.

Who are Wired Systems For?

Wired camera systems are best for people with larger budgets. Especially budgets that include professional installation. If you want a solid surveillance system with many cameras, robust recording and the option to go off-grid, wired is the way to go.

Wireless cameras are best for small dwellings where you want to spend as little as possible, have an easy installation process or perhaps in situations where you aren’t allowed to drill extensively. The choice is ultimately up to you!

source https://www.online-tech-tips.com/computer-tips/how-wired-security-camera-systems-work/

How to Remove Chrome Managed By Your Organization

Do you keep seeing a “Managed by your organization” message when opening the browser menu in Google Chrome? That’s typical if the desktop device is part of a corporate network; system administrators often deploy policies to manage browser settings and permissions remotely.

Sometimes, though, the “Managed by your organization” message can show up on your own devices. That could mean one of two things. You have legitimate software—such as a third-party password manager—that use local policies to run on Chrome. Or, you have malware on your computer.

Below, you’ll find several methods that can help you remove the Chrome “Managed by your organization” message on Windows and Mac.

Scan for Malware and Browser Hijackers

If a malicious program or browser hijacker is what triggers the “Managed by your organization” message in Chrome, you can usually remove it by thoroughly cleaning your computer of malware.

Perform a Malware Scan

Start by scanning your PC or Mac for malware. If you have an antivirus scanner on your computer, run both a quick scan and a system-wide scan. On Windows, you can also use Windows Security (which you can open by going to Start > Settings > Update & Security > Windows Security) to check for malware.

If nothing shows up, perform another scan with a dedicated malware removal tool. The free version of Malwarebytes, for example, does a great job at detecting and removing harmful software. It’s available for both the PC and Mac.

Remove Sketchy Programs

Scanning for malware aside, you should manually check for and remove any unfamiliar programs from your computer.

PC: Right-click the Start button and choose Apps and Features. On the list of programs that shows up, pick each app that you want to remove and select Uninstall.

Mac: Open Finder and select the Applications side-tab. Then, drag any unfamiliar applications and drop them into the Trash.

Clean Up Computer (PC Only)

If you use Chrome on Windows, you can use the browser’s built-in computer cleanup tool to eliminate malicious extensions and browser hijackers. 

Open the Chrome menu and select Settings. Then, expand Advanced from the left navigation area and choose Reset and clean up. Follow by selecting Clean up computer > Find to scan for harmful software.

Remove Configuration Profiles (Mac Only)

On the Mac, malicious programs can install configuration profiles that hijack how Chrome works. Try removing them. 

Open the Apple menu and select System Preferences. If you see a Profiles icon, select it and remove any suspicious configuration profiles inside it. Follow by restarting your Mac.

Delete Policies – Registry/Terminal

If you still keep seeing the Chrome “Managed by your organization” message, you must check for any Chrome policies on your PC or Mac. To do that, type chrome://policy into a new tab and press Enter.

You should then see any active or dormant policies under the Chrome Policies section. You can usually select a policy to figure out what it’s all about.

If a policy doesn’t appear to be related to a trustworthy program or browser extension, you can remove it using the Registry Editor in Windows or the Terminal on Mac.

Note: It’s usually a good idea to back up the system registry in Windows before modifying anything inside it.

Delete Chrome Policies on Windows

Press Windows+R, type regedit, and select OK. Then, copy and paste the following path into the address bar and press Enter

Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Google\Chrome

Pick the Chrome key from the left pane of the Registry Editor. Then, right-click the Chrome policy that you want to remove and select Delete.

Delete Chrome Policies on Mac

Press Command+Space to bring up Spotlight Search. Then, type terminal and press Enter

Type the following command into the Terminal window, replacing [policy] with the name of the policy that you want to delete:

defaults delete com.google.Chrome [policy]

Press Enter to delete the policy.

Reset/Reinstall Chrome

If you still keep seeing the “Managed by your organization” message, try resetting Chrome. If that does not work, you must consider re-installing the browser. 

Before you go ahead, make sure to sync your Chrome browsing data (passwords, bookmarks, auto-fill data, etc.) to your Google Account by heading over to Settings > Sync and Google services > Manage what you sync.

Reset Google Chrome

Go to Chrome’s Settings screen, select Advanced, and select Reset and clean up. Then, pick the Reset settings to their original defaults option and select Reset settings to confirm.

After resetting Chrome, restart your computer and sign in to the browser. Then, head into Settings > Extensions to re-enable your browser extensions. Check if the “Managed by your organization” message appears on the Chrome menu.

Reinstall Google Chrome

You can uninstall Chrome by heading over to the Apps & features pane in Windows or the Applications folder on your Mac. Follow by deleting any left-over folders.

PC: Press Windows+R to open Run. Then, copy and paste the following folder paths and delete the Chrome folder from each directory.

  • C:\Users\%userprofile%\AppData\Local\Google\
  • C:\Program Files\Google

Mac: Open Finder and press Shift+Command+G. Copy and paste the following folder paths into the Go to Folder box and select Go. Then, remove the Chrome folder from each directory.

  • ~/Library/Application Support/Google/
  • ~/Library/Caches/Google/

Once you’ve done that, reboot your PC or Mac and re-install Google Chrome. That should hopefully remove Chrome’s “Managed by your organization” message for good.

Google Chrome: Managed By Yourself

You do not have to remove the “Managed by your organization” message in Chrome if it’s the result of a non-malicious program or browser extension. If you do, you’ll only end up preventing the program or extension from running correctly. 

But suppose you have any reason to believe otherwise (crashes and freezes in Chrome are other major indications that something’s wrong). In that case, scanning for malware, deleting browser policies, or resetting/reinstalling Chrome should help you get rid of it.

source https://www.online-tech-tips.com/google-softwaretips/how-to-remove-chrome-managed-by-your-organization/

Internet Comment Etiquette to Improve Your Social Experience

Sometimes, the internet can seem like a pretty intimidating place. Whatever you post, there will be people looking at and commenting on it. And, a lot of people feel much safer saying things they normally wouldn’t when they’re sitting in front of a screen instead of in front of an actual person. Especially if the type of social media they’re using is one that provides a sense of anonymity

There are ways while commenting on the internet, though, that can allow you a stress-free experience. Even if someone is intentionally trying to instigate something, you don’t have to allow yourself to get caught up in it. There’s enough stress in the world already, the internet doesn’t have to be another source of it.

Think Before You Post

Before you make any type of post on the internet, it can help to think beforehand about what kind of response it may elicit. If you are posting something related to controversial topics, like politics or religion, it’s extremely likely you’ll get some angry responses. So decide whether or not that’s worth what you want to post.

If you’re replying to something someone has commented, think about what you’re adding to the conversation and if it’s necessary. Being selective about what you say will help you avoid outright negative reactions from others. 

If You Can, Ignore It

In most situations where you see a post or comment that really puts you on edge, the best thing to do is not engage. You’ll save yourself a lot of stress by refraining from responding. 

More often than not, it’s not worth the effort. Unfollowing or blocking the person will also help you to avoid these sorts of things you don’t want to see. And you’ll spend much less time being upset over what was posted. 

Also keep in mind that it’s extremely difficult to really change someone’s mind over the internet. Because of the nature of the platform, negative feedback usually will only reinforce someone’s beliefs, and they’re unlikely to budge no matter what information you provide. 

When people form opinions, they use cognitive biases to do so, which isn’t always necessarily based on logic. Nobody is exempt from this, so when a post or comment you disagree with creates a reaction in you, what you can do instead is try to understand why it made you feel that way and move on. 

When You Should Respond

There are times, however, when responding to something may be a good idea. If you can provide deeper insight or information someone is likely to be receptive to, then your response may actually be constructive to the conversation. 

Also, if someone you know in person has posted something you disagree with, they may be more likely to listen to you. Someone you know has some sort of emotional tie to you, so they are more apt to consider your response. A complete stranger is much less likely to care about what you have to say. 

How to Respond Tactfully

So, if you decide to post a comment, there are some things you should keep in mind. First of all, don’t allow yourself to stoop to insults. There’s nothing to gain from using them, and people are much less likely to take you seriously. 

Even if someone insults you first, instead of reciprocating, it should be a sign that you should step back from the situation. 

Try to be aware of the wording you use when typing a response. Over the internet, there’s no tone of voice, so it’s easy for things to be taken the wrong way. If you suspect something would come across as confusing, try wording it differently. Using emoticons can also be beneficial in these situations to show others you mean well. 

Also try not to come off as condescending, or people will not be as receptive towards you. Being open-minded can be your best course of action, as long as the person you’re replying to is not being hateful or promoting something dangerous. 

How to Spot a Troll

If you find yourself in a spat on the internet, it’s very likely you could be dealing with someone who just wants to argue for the sake of arguing. Or, they don’t care at all about what you have to say and instead simply want to mess with you. 

There are a few ways you can catch one of these people, usually called a troll, and once you do the best thing is to disengage. Trolls don’t want any true discussion, they just want to cause a reaction in order to feel superior or for entertainment. 

If they continually repeat the same rhetoric or phrase over and over, as if they aren’t even reading what you say, it’s likely a troll. This is also true if they make hyperbolic, wild claims and suggestions or try to use the shock factor. 

Using Comment Etiquette

In order to keep stress out of using the internet, trying to take part only in constructive and positive conversation can help you immensely not only in your online life but also life in general. 

The internet is a great creation that allows you to talk with others who, without it, you never would have been able to. So while there are definitely benefits from using the internet, there can also be some pitfalls. Following these tips can help you navigate your way through. 

source https://www.online-tech-tips.com/computer-tips/internet-comment-etiquette-to-improve-your-social-experience/

6 Advanced Tooltips in Minecraft to Up Your Game

When you’re new to Minecraft, you’re more concerned with surviving the first day and getting a shelter built. Higher-level players rely on different tricks – and advanced tool tips – to give them an edge, especially when playing on Hardcore Mode.

Minecraft has an oft-ignored tooltip feature that displays additional information about items within the game. The tooltips show specific IDs for each item, but they also show more critical details: remaining tool, weapon, and armor durability, as well as other important details. 

How to Turn On Advanced Tooltips

The easiest way to turn on Advanced Tooltips in Minecraft is to press F3+H at the same time. A message will appear on screen that reads:

When you see this, you’ll know the command succeeded. Some users report problems turning on tooltips this way due to hardcoded commands within their keyboard that set F3 + H to another shortcut. If your keyboard won’t allow you to remap the shortcut, you’ll have to find another way to turn on Advanced Tooltips.

There are mods that allow you to enable the feature and access other debug commands through the options menu. 

Tooltips Show Remaining Weapon and Tool Durability

In vanilla Minecraft, it can be difficult to gauge how many hits remain on your weapons. Maybe you found or fished an incredible item with powerful enchantments, but its durability gauge has decreased to almost nothing. 

Advanced Tooltips in Minecraft don’t only show a gauge. They show the exact numeric durability remaining on any given item. Take a look at the above image for an example. Using these tooltips allows you to pay attention to the rate weapons break down, too. 

It can be the difference between putting your new-found item to use immediately or stashing it for repair later. Although a good rule of thumb is any damaged item you fish out is typically one use from breaking. 

Tooltips Show Remaining Armor Durability

Just as Advanced Tooltips in Minecraft demonstrate remaining weapon and tool durability, it can also show you how much more abuse your armor can take. Different enemies and types of damage cause your armor to decrease at certain rates. The above damage was caused after a Creeper explosion at point-blank range.

For example, a fall might damage a set of boots, but it isn’t likely going to damage your chest plate. Burning will damage all of your armor. Armor worn by enemies won’t take damage except when worn by undead creatures, and their helmets will take damage when they begin to burn in sunlight.

Tooltips can also be used to designate additional information about items, such as whether a beehive contains bees or not. Beyond that, tooltips offer no additional information–but there are other ways you can put the debug menu to use.

F3+B Activates Visible Hitboxes and Line of Sight

The F3 key paired with another key isn’t just for activating tooltips–it’s for manipulating the in-game debug menu. This allows you to view a wealth of information you might not otherwise have access to. For example, if you hit F3+B, you can view different entity’s hitboxes and their line of sight. 

This can be particularly useful if you aren’t sure how large an enemy actually is. You can gauge how close you need to get in order to land a blow, as well as what direction that enemy is looking. When it comes to Endermen, you want to avoid making direct eye contact–and this command can help. 

F3+T Reloads Resource Packs

Minecraft is an old game with a lot of modifications over the years. Though it typically works without a hitch, there are times when the resource packs can fail. You might encounter graphical glitches or weird bugs that interfere with gameplay.

When this happens, press F3+T to reload the texture packs. This is particularly useful if you are playing a modded version of Minecraft or you’ve downloaded additional texture packs to improve the game’s appearance. 

The game will pause and a load screen will appear. After the bar fills complete, the screen will flash and the game will resume with all of the textures reloaded. 

Alt+F3 Displays Frame Time Graph

No one would define Minecraft as a resource intensive game, but specific mods can definitely impact performance. If you’re concerned about your in-game framerate and you want to monitor it while you perform specific activities, press Alt+F3. This opens the debug menu, with the added frame time graph at the bottom.

You can play the game while this menu is on screen (although it is quite distracting) and monitor how your frame rate behaves during play. This is a good way to measure exactly what activities might be impacting your performance.

F3+G Shows Chunk Borders

The Minecraft world is divided into different sections called “chunks,” each of which is a 256-block high, 16×16 area. They are important for a variety of reasons, but the main one is this: Chunks that remain loaded at all times affect the gameplay of the entire world.

For example, your spawn chunk (the section where you spawn within the game) is always loaded. If you have a lot of redstone clocks set up that are causing lag in that chunk, then every chunk in the game will also experience lag. 

Most chunks are not loaded, however. If you want to make sure you’re building things in different chunks to avoid overlap and potential errors, it’s important to be able to see chunk borders. Press F3+G to show these on-screen. 

Once you know where the chunk borders lie, you can better plan redstone machines, mods, and much more. 

source https://www.online-tech-tips.com/gaming/6-advanced-tooltips-in-minecraft-to-up-your-game/

6 Advanced Tooltips in Minecraft to Up Your Game

When you’re new to Minecraft, you’re more concerned with surviving the first day and getting a shelter built. Higher-level players rely on different tricks – and advanced tool tips – to give them an edge, especially when playing on Hardcore Mode.

Minecraft has an oft-ignored tooltip feature that displays additional information about items within the game. The tooltips show specific IDs for each item, but they also show more critical details: remaining tool, weapon, and armor durability, as well as other important details. 

How to Turn On Advanced Tooltips

The easiest way to turn on Advanced Tooltips in Minecraft is to press F3+H at the same time. A message will appear on screen that reads:

When you see this, you’ll know the command succeeded. Some users report problems turning on tooltips this way due to hardcoded commands within their keyboard that set F3 + H to another shortcut. If your keyboard won’t allow you to remap the shortcut, you’ll have to find another way to turn on Advanced Tooltips.

There are mods that allow you to enable the feature and access other debug commands through the options menu. 

Tooltips Show Remaining Weapon and Tool Durability

In vanilla Minecraft, it can be difficult to gauge how many hits remain on your weapons. Maybe you found or fished an incredible item with powerful enchantments, but its durability gauge has decreased to almost nothing. 

Advanced Tooltips in Minecraft don’t only show a gauge. They show the exact numeric durability remaining on any given item. Take a look at the above image for an example. Using these tooltips allows you to pay attention to the rate weapons break down, too. 

It can be the difference between putting your new-found item to use immediately or stashing it for repair later. Although a good rule of thumb is any damaged item you fish out is typically one use from breaking. 

Tooltips Show Remaining Armor Durability

Just as Advanced Tooltips in Minecraft demonstrate remaining weapon and tool durability, it can also show you how much more abuse your armor can take. Different enemies and types of damage cause your armor to decrease at certain rates. The above damage was caused after a Creeper explosion at point-blank range.

For example, a fall might damage a set of boots, but it isn’t likely going to damage your chest plate. Burning will damage all of your armor. Armor worn by enemies won’t take damage except when worn by undead creatures, and their helmets will take damage when they begin to burn in sunlight.

Tooltips can also be used to designate additional information about items, such as whether a beehive contains bees or not. Beyond that, tooltips offer no additional information–but there are other ways you can put the debug menu to use.

F3+B Activates Visible Hitboxes and Line of Sight

The F3 key paired with another key isn’t just for activating tooltips–it’s for manipulating the in-game debug menu. This allows you to view a wealth of information you might not otherwise have access to. For example, if you hit F3+B, you can view different entity’s hitboxes and their line of sight. 

This can be particularly useful if you aren’t sure how large an enemy actually is. You can gauge how close you need to get in order to land a blow, as well as what direction that enemy is looking. When it comes to Endermen, you want to avoid making direct eye contact–and this command can help. 

F3+T Reloads Resource Packs

Minecraft is an old game with a lot of modifications over the years. Though it typically works without a hitch, there are times when the resource packs can fail. You might encounter graphical glitches or weird bugs that interfere with gameplay.

When this happens, press F3+T to reload the texture packs. This is particularly useful if you are playing a modded version of Minecraft or you’ve downloaded additional texture packs to improve the game’s appearance. 

The game will pause and a load screen will appear. After the bar fills complete, the screen will flash and the game will resume with all of the textures reloaded. 

Alt+F3 Displays Frame Time Graph

No one would define Minecraft as a resource intensive game, but specific mods can definitely impact performance. If you’re concerned about your in-game framerate and you want to monitor it while you perform specific activities, press Alt+F3. This opens the debug menu, with the added frame time graph at the bottom.

You can play the game while this menu is on screen (although it is quite distracting) and monitor how your frame rate behaves during play. This is a good way to measure exactly what activities might be impacting your performance.

F3+G Shows Chunk Borders

The Minecraft world is divided into different sections called “chunks,” each of which is a 256-block high, 16×16 area. They are important for a variety of reasons, but the main one is this: Chunks that remain loaded at all times affect the gameplay of the entire world.

For example, your spawn chunk (the section where you spawn within the game) is always loaded. If you have a lot of redstone clocks set up that are causing lag in that chunk, then every chunk in the game will also experience lag. 

Most chunks are not loaded, however. If you want to make sure you’re building things in different chunks to avoid overlap and potential errors, it’s important to be able to see chunk borders. Press F3+G to show these on-screen. 

Once you know where the chunk borders lie, you can better plan redstone machines, mods, and much more. 

source https://www.online-tech-tips.com/gaming/6-advanced-tooltips-in-minecraft-to-up-your-game/